It’s interesting what motivates us. For some, it’s inspirational sayings or Scripture scribbled on strategically placed sticky notes.Others hire life coaches and schooled clinicians, attend conferences, or join support groups. We spend time and more money in search of that magic motivator—the one thing that unleashes our true potential.

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It’s interesting what motivates us. For some, it’s inspirational sayings or Scripture scribbled on strategically placed sticky notes.Others hire life coaches and schooled clinicians, attend conferences, or join support groups. We spend time and more money in search of that magic motivator—the one thing that unleashes our true potential.

It’s been more than two decades since Scheri first got the diagnosis she feared was a death sentence. She’s learned much about the disease since then, and most importantly, how to live well with it. While it has progressed enough to make her legs too unstable to safely drive, and running laps is likewise in the past, the ability to walk (albeit slowly and for short distances) stuck with her.

A while back my sister said something that stayed with me. We were talking about being in the workforce and how—no matter the creds you acquire, the years of experience, the courses completed, the certificates confirming you’ve earned a seat at the table or the coveted invite to the VIP cocktail—there remains a prickle of doubt, a sinister little internal voice that whispers, “You’re faking it.” In normal times, I might not admit that out loud. But this is 2020.

2020 seems to be the year most of us are ready to forget. And yet, God always seems to do His most magnificent work in the muck we make.I was reminded of this when Steve Ware popped into a recent Greater Irmo Chamber of Commerce “Coffee Talk” meeting and briefly shared his incredible story of homelessness and hope.Steve’s shocking story rolls of his tongue like it happens to all of us. Here’s this athletic looking, polished CEO at a Chamber meeting. But that’s so 2020.

‍What happens when you love something with all your heart and God asks you to give it up? If you’re Ed and Leré Robinson, you obey. You put your house in South Africa on the market, where it gets gobbled up immediately. Unprepared for the quick turnaround, you move your two little girls and newborn into an apartment, and you complete the agonizing process of leaving your entire family, your culture, all your friends, and everything you’ve ever known and loved behind.

As I continue to speak with the survivors of human trafficking and share their stories for our Lighthouse for Life ongoing video series, “The Truth of Trafficking: From Dark to Light,” restoration is a recurring theme.

When it comes to human trafficking, the where-and-how-do-I-help-questions can be overwhelming. They’re so overwhelming, it feels easier – safer even – to do nothing. How can my drop of assistance in this vast ocean of need even matter, anyway?

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